Masterchef and the classroom

The third season of Masterchef is about to come to an end here in Australia and its just dawned on me that it provides a great model for teachers to use in their own classrooms.

What we see in Masterchef is home cooks who aren’t trained chefs given a task or challenge to complete but with very little instruction on how to complete the task. They have to create a meal or dish to serve in the specified time frame. Its not totally free play, they are given guidelines for what they can create and often a restricted number of pantry items to cook with but choice as to what they will use and create with them. Classic project based learning tasks.

The contestants demonstrate problem solving skills in deciding what to cook and how to overcome the limits they have to work in. At the end of each episode they present their dish to the judges for feedback on it success (or otherwise). This feedback isn’t only from the head judges, often its front the people they cook for in challenges and gives them a timely insight into what worked and what didn’t, or what tasted good and what didn’t. But the judges don’t just wait until the finished product, they move from bench to bench using their professional experience to guide their ‘students’ when they feel they maybe goin off track.

When they aren’t cooking we are often shown pictures of them reading books to learn new techniques, favours that work well together and about cooking food from other cultures – self directed learning.

This to me, is a great model for classroom learning. Create tasks that will incorporate problem solving, self directed learing, something to create tasks (that hopefully is meaningful), that they can present for feedback – not just for marks but for what they know, have learned or the usefulness of what they’ve created and that allows them to improve what they are doing before they’ve gone too far the wring direction. Scaffold the tasks to in a way to give direction but not to stifle creativity or independent thinking, and that allows students to work to a level they are capable of achieving.

The final piece that I haven’t mentioned is the Friday night ‘master class’. An opportunity for the professionals to demonstrate some techniques or dishes to their pupils. To share with them something they know more about than the students. And, more importantly they bring in other experts to their kitchen to teach the things they don’t know as well as they do.

This is one area that we teachers can really learn from. We shouldn’t be afraid to call on others who know more than we do to teach something. And that digest have to be from outside our school, we could use an IT teacher to demonstrate skills, an art teacher to teach design or even someone from our own faculty will have different expertise in different areas to me. To be honest there are probably students who could give masterclasses on many things to. Off the top of my head, in my year 10 class I currently have students who could give master classes on web design, photoshop.

The challenge now is to learn how to devplop the tasks, how to scaffold, write rubrics, as well as re-educate myself, other staff and most importantly the students on how to work in this environment. Easy right?

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